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 1926 Model TT Restoration: Update 22 - Rear Axle/Brakes 2 
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Do you have to worry about flooding the carb with the fuel pump? The only real experience I have with carbs is on motorcycles that are gravity fed

I worked all day today so tomorrow I'm not doing shit. Wife is out of town to boot. If you're free we can go by kinkos and copy whatever you want out of this manual

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Sat Apr 06, 2019 5:36 pm
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Arisaka wrote:
On the 1926 cars, the gas tank was in the front cowling, basically between the dash and firewall. However, on the trucks the tank lives under the seat. Here is mine, covered in a heavy layer of dust


Incase anyone is wondering about why this happened, It should be noted that this was a big improvent. Model t's dont have a fuel pump so they are purely gravity feed. So if you have a low gas tank, and are going up a steep hill, you can run out of gas. Guys would get around this by backing up a hill.

RocketScott wrote:
Do you have to worry about flooding the carb with the fuel pump? The only real experience I have with carbs is on motorcycles that are gravity fed


He will need to run a regulator, to limit it to a 1 or 2lbs.


Sat Apr 06, 2019 5:41 pm
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shaggy wrote:
Arisaka wrote:
On the 1926 cars, the gas tank was in the front cowling, basically between the dash and firewall. However, on the trucks s the tank lives under the seat. Here is mine, covered in a heavy layer of dust w


Incase anyone is wondering about why this happened, It should be noted that this was a big improvent. Model t's dont have a fuel pump so they are purely gravity feed. So if you have a low gas tank, and are going up a steep hill, you can run out of gas. Guys would get around this by backing up a hill.

RocketScott wrote:
Do you have to worry about flooding the carb with the fuel pump? The only real experience I have with carbs is on motorcycles that are gravity fed


He will need to run a regulator, to limit it to a 1 or 2lbs.

This is a special low-pressure fuel pump, that puts out 3 psi. Otherwise Shaggy is absolutely right, I would need a fuel pressure regulator. You are also correct Scott, in that a typical high pressure fuel pump would overwhelm the carb and cause gas to squirt out of the carb. I should have mentioned all this.


Sat Apr 06, 2019 6:02 pm
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Model T’s never had seat belts. In fact seat belts didn’t come into production until the mid-1950s. But I will be taking family and friends for rides, so I wanted seat belts. I set out to design and install a system that would provide passenges some retention in the cab during low speed collisions.

Looking through the Model T forums, I learned that Model T cabs tend to separate from their frames during rollovers. And with their high center of gravity, rollovers happen. So, the prevailing advice was to attach the seat belt anchors to the cab, NOT the frame. That made the job much tougher, because there isn’t a lot of structure in a Model T cab. Here is the cab

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Here is the structure available to anchor the belts. Nothing but sheet metal.

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This didn’t look strong enough so I figured on putting in a full-width section of angle iron to reinforce the sheet metal. I was over at RocketScott’s place a week ago, to get help with some sandblasting. I mentioned my plans for reinforcing the cab, and Scott pulled out of his stash a hefty chunk of angle iron that was just right. And being RocketScott, he gave it to me! Here it is

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I trimmed the ends to length, and drilled four holes in the angle for the anchors.

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Here is the angle with the seat belt anchors attached with grade 8 1/2-inch bolts, and with a coat of black paint.

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Then I wedged the assembly in the cab and marked the cab for drilling the mounting bolts

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Here it is mounted with four 1/2 x 2 inch grade 8 bolts. Reinforcing the cab sheet metal, at each mounting hole, are 2” x 2” washers I made from 0.125 inch steel to spread the point load. The seat belts are inside plastic bags to keep them clean.

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Then the seat goes back in

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Many thanks to RocketScott for his continued assistance in getting this truck back on the road!

Next up is restoring some Model T Tools. Coming up is installation of a hydraulic brake system, and then a new radiator. And then its time to start her up!


Fri Apr 12, 2019 5:34 pm
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After quite a bit of looking I have come up with two model T truck jacks. One I bought off eBay and the other was given to me by my Model T buddy. Here is that second jack, in the as-received condition

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Took it up to RocketScotts for sandblasting the exterior. Here it is after much of the rust had been knocked off

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Found some manufacturer marks under the rust

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Brought it home for a detailed disassembly and cleaning. First step was to drive out the retaining pin, that actually looked like a 16 penny nail

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Then the handle can come off, along with the crown gear, bushing, spring and retaining nut

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Here are the parts after lots of solvent and wire brushing. Pretty simple design.

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During disassembly I noticed that this jack used to be green

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Treated all parts with a rust conversion coating. Used this stuff, which goes on clear and turns the metal black

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Then came the enamel color coat

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I highlighted manufacturer marks in black enamel

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Then all the moving parts are greased or oiled, and the jack reassembled. This thing may be old, but it operates smoothly in both directions, and easily lifts either axel of my truck. Actually, it is massive overkill for lifting my truck.

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I will tackle the other jack next


Last edited by Arisaka on Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:35 am, edited 1 time in total.



Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:18 am
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I love that detail. Nice!

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Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:34 am
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Holy crap . . . even the freaking jack gets the royal treatment! :thumbsup2:

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Leave it cleaner than you found it.


Sun Apr 14, 2019 11:19 am
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Quality work.

Tell me about that rust conversion, please. What does it convert to and do you remove it after it's done its thing?

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Sun Apr 14, 2019 12:01 pm
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dreadi wrote:
Quality work.

Tell me about that rust conversion, please. What does it convert to and do you remove it after it's done its thing?

Active ingredient is phosphoric acid - converts iron oxide (rust) into iron phosphate. Let it dry for 24 hrs and then apply top coat right over it.


Sun Apr 14, 2019 1:20 pm
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Arisaka wrote:
dreadi wrote:
Quality work.

Tell me about that rust conversion, please. What does it convert to and do you remove it after it's done its thing?

Active ingredient is phosphoric acid - converts iron oxide (rust) into iron phosphate. Let it dry for 24 hrs and then apply top coat right over it.



Are you telling me that's Parkerize in a can?

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Sun Apr 14, 2019 1:42 pm
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dreadi wrote:
Arisaka wrote:
dreadi wrote:
Quality work.

Tell me about that rust conversion, please. What does it convert to and do you remove it after it's done its thing?

Active ingredient is phosphoric acid - converts iron oxide (rust) into iron phosphate. Let it dry for 24 hrs and then apply top coat right over it.



Are you telling me that's Parkerize in a can?


Kinda sorta https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rust_converter

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Sun Apr 14, 2019 1:49 pm
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That jack turned out sweet. Love that you could replicate the original color. Detailing the markings is a nice touch, takes it to the next level. I've yet to find an easy way to paint stuff like that. Maybe a foam rubber that can hold the paint but not push too much past the letters. Dunno how they did it at the factory

The seat belts look great too. I was having a hard time understanding how the angle was going to go in there. That blends right in

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Here are the parts after lots of solvent and wire brushing. Pretty simple design.


Next time do the disassembly first and soak in solvent. It will blast a lot better and save some time

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Sun Apr 14, 2019 5:24 pm
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Pablo wrote:
dreadi wrote:
Arisaka wrote:
dreadi wrote:
Quality work.

Tell me about that rust conversion, please. What does it convert to and do you remove it after it's done its thing?

Active ingredient is phosphoric acid - converts iron oxide (rust) into iron phosphate. Let it dry for 24 hrs and then apply top coat right over it.



Are you telling me that's Parkerize in a can?


Kinda sorta https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rust_converter


This is the stuff I use:

http://www.jasco-help.com/product/prep-primer

It's probably cheaper than the spray cans but takes more time to apply correctly. It bubbles up quite a bit and if you don't knock the bubbles down they will affect the paint job

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Sun Apr 14, 2019 5:29 pm
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Here is the second truck jack

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The usual rusty and froze up paperweight

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Took it apart at RocketScotts for a sandblast. Just had to remove one large round-head bolt, and it all came apart.

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Collected up all the pieces and brought them home for a detailed cleaning. No clue as to what the jack’s original color was, but with all things Model T you can’t go wrong with black. So I sprayed each piece with a conversion coating to attack any remaining rust.

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Followed that with a topcoat or black enamel, and then greased and reassembled

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The shaft that the pivot arm rides on was pretty worn. I may have to install a spacer or bushing at a later date. But first I need a jack handle. Model TT jacks of this style NEVER come with their original jack handle. They always get separated and the handle lost. But I came across a drawing for the handle. 5/16 steel by 1 inch wide by 18 inches long, with a hole drilled in one end. The drawing also showed a 90 degree twist 6 inches from the end of the handle. I decided to forgo the twist because, during some setup work, I couldn’t get the steel hot enough with a propane Torch, to give it a tight 90 degree twist, even with my biggest wrench. So it will remain straight

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The jack operates well, except for the slop around the pivot arm. I tried an additional washer under the bolt to see if that would help, but no dice. Going to need a bushing to tighten it up. I will make one later.

Working on a rim spreader tool tomorrow


Mon Apr 15, 2019 3:14 pm
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Expecting my hydraulic brake kit in a week or so. Time to get to work on the rear axle. Jobs to do before the brakes get here are:
1. Pull rear wheels
2. Remove Rocky Mountain Brakes and operating rods
3. Clean off all grease from backing plate and emergency brake assembly.
4. Inspect emergency brake shoes
5. Remove outer axle seals
6. Remove outer roller bearings and inspect
7. Remove bearing sleeves and inspect
8. Remove inner seals
8. Order necessary parts
9. Reassemble axle

Won’t get all this done today. But here goes.

Pushed the old girl out of the garage to turn her around. She hasn’t seen the light of day in many years

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Pushed her back in the garage nose-first, to get better access to the rear wheels. First step is to remove the hub cap and castle nut

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Then thread on the special wheel puller on loan to me from my model t buddy

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Tighten up the clamping bolt so you don’t strip the hub threads

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Then crank down on the puller bolt with a big wrench and hope the wheel pops off

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Lucky for me both wheels popped right off! Once I got the first one off I could see that my dad had been in there 20 years ago and had re-lined the emergency brake shoes. He did an excellent job of cleaning and greasing everything, so my job was easy. I bet dad had a tough time of it though!

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Here is what it looks like inside

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Big key holding the wheel in place!

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That big outer ring is the Rocky Mountain Brake band. It is activated by a rod that clamps the band down around the outside of a special rear brake drum. That drum is bolted to the wood spoke wheels. The emergency brake uses a mechanical cam to expand the shoes out to press on the inside of the same brake drum, like conventional brake shoes. The drum gets replaced by a tophat disc brake rotor. The emergency brake will be located inside the tophat, similar to modern e-brake systems. A brake caliper will clamp down on the disc rotor per the usual design. So, the Rocky Mountain Brakes and the drum will have to go. I will try to sell them to recoup a few bucks. Rocky’s are prized among Model T people, as they give you a second, independent rear brake. The other brake is on the transmission. There are no front brakes on a T. So the Rocky’s are a great thing to have if you break a driveshaft or differential, or if you have a Warford transmission that pops out of gear on a hill. In those cases all you have is the emergency brake, and they aren’t great.

So back to the axle. That small ring around the axle is the outer seal. It gets pried off

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The job of the outer seal is to keep grease from the roller bearing out of the emergency brake assembly. Judging by how much grease was on the backing plate and e-brake shoes, the outer seals are shot.

Next job is to pull the roller bearings and sleeves, and then get to the inner seals. But I haven’t figured out how to get the roller bearing out yet. You can see the end of the roller bearing cage here

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When i get them out they will look like this

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The bearing fits inside a hardened sleeve that looks like this

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Takes a special tool to get it out. My buddy says he will loan me one.

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The last thing I can do today is to remove the Rocky Mountain Brake assembly. It is held on by two large bolts. By the way, that big grease cup is what feeds grease to the roller bearing.

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Here is one side removed and on the floor.

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Tomorrow I have to wrangle out those roller bearings and inspect them. Then I can reach in and feel how worn the sleeves are. If you can feel a step or groove worn in them, then they are shot. Then I will pull the inner seal, which is the most important seal. It keeps differential fluid in the differential. It is likely bad. Ordering parts and waiting for them is the next step.


Wed Apr 17, 2019 6:23 pm
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