Gun store Shooting Locations It is currently Fri Aug 23, 2019 8:38 pm


Rules Brads Guns Rainier Arms McCallen Killer Innovations Fessleman Firearms
WGO Chat Room Rehv Arms Vantage Reloading
Gear Fortis WCA 2A Ind. Pintos WAC
Calendar




Reply to topic  [ 214 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 ... 15  Next
 1926 Model TT Restoration: Update 39 - Valves and Head 
Author Message
Site Supporter
User avatar
Site Supporter

Location: I-5 /512
Joined: Thu Dec 8, 2011
Posts: 12941
Real Name: chris
:thumbsup2: awesome job restoring this.

_________________
Image


Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:34 pm
Profile
Online
Site Supporter
User avatar
Site Supporter

Location: South Seattle
Joined: Thu May 2, 2013
Posts: 5538
Real Name: Steve
Too bad you're not very innovative...

:ROFLMAO:


Helluva good job there, bud! :thumbsup2:


Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:38 pm
Profile
Site Supporter
User avatar
Site Supporter

Location: Tacoma
Joined: Sat May 4, 2013
Posts: 3006
Thanks guys! An engineer with tools and scrap is a dangerous thing


Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:50 pm
Profile
User avatar

Location: Snohomish Co
Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2018
Posts: 122
Welp, just picked up anouther model t body today, that puts me a 3 roadsters including my dads. A local guy stopped by my garage, and mentioned he picked up a few pallets of model t tin. I picked out enough pieces for a '25 or earlier roadster with low firewall, gave him $300.

Should be pretty sweet behind my hot v-8 60 flathead. I'm shooting for under 1600lbs. BTW he does have the most of an early 2dr sedan body, it needs wood and assembly, also 2/3rds of a touring.


Sun Apr 28, 2019 4:25 pm
Profile
Site Supporter
User avatar
Site Supporter

Location: Tacoma
Joined: Sat May 4, 2013
Posts: 3006
shaggy wrote:
Welp, just picked up anouther model t body today, that puts me a 3 roadsters including my dads. A local guy stopped by my garage, and mentioned he picked up a few pallets of model t tin. I picked out enough pieces for a '25 or earlier roadster with low firewall, gave him $300.

Should be pretty sweet behind my hot v-8 60 flathead. I'm shooting for under 1600lbs. BTW he does have the most of an early 2dr sedan body, it needs wood and assembly, also 2/3rds of a touring.

How about some pics shaggy?


Sun Apr 28, 2019 5:57 pm
Profile
User avatar

Location: Snohomish Co
Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2018
Posts: 122
Arisaka wrote:
How about some pics shaggy?

I'll get some when i get a chance, i dont have a smart phone. As you can imagine when the wood in t's rot out it's just a pile of unattractive tin, so i was fitting stuff up tonite. It's free of any rust holes minus a spot on turtledeck near where the factory solders it and was probably ground thin, and missing the panel behind the seat.

BTW he had a pair of pretty nice running boards, including a pair of the 12" long truck ones, incase you need, oh and some pretty solid fenders that needed some good hammer work.


Sun Apr 28, 2019 8:20 pm
Profile
Site Supporter
User avatar
Site Supporter

Location: Tacoma
Joined: Sat May 4, 2013
Posts: 3006
Thanks shaggy! As it turns out, my tin is solid but rough. Lots of small dents. But that’s just the way I want this truck to look. Like it has put in its time, and is still working for a living


Last edited by Arisaka on Mon Apr 29, 2019 4:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Sun Apr 28, 2019 8:39 pm
Profile
Site Supporter
User avatar
Site Supporter

Location: Tacoma
Joined: Sat May 4, 2013
Posts: 3006
Time to dive into the hydraulic brake installation. This is fairly big job, and will be a multi-part update

First order of business is unpacking and taking inventory. Here are the contents of the shipping box

Image

Starting from the upper left corner are the following components

Brake calipers

Image

Image

Bolts to attach the brake discs to my rear wheels

Image

Brake discs

Image

Master cylinder

Image

Caliper and master cylinder mounting brackets

Image

Steel and flexible brake lines

Image

At one end of the flex line is a pressure switch, that will replace my unreliable mechanical brake light switch

Image

Finally, here is my brake pedal I sent in when I ordered the brake kit. It had a tab welded to the end, which accepts a clevis and rod that actuates the master cylinder

Image

Image

First job is to reinstall my brake pedal. This is a tricky job as the added tab on the brake pedal makes is difficult to weasel the brake pedal into the transmission. With some fiddling around I got it figured out. Here you can see the pedal shaft half way into the tranny. That silver thing is a band clamp that keeps the brake band in place

Image

Then comes the spring, washer and nut

Image

You no doubt noticed all the rags stuffed into the transmission. This is to prevent a spring, washer or nut from dropping into the transmission. Doing so is a classic Model T screwup, and will get you lots of laughs and ribbing from other Model T guys. You can try fishing around with magnets and borescopes to get these little parts out, but it is mostly futile. Generally you have to pull the hogshead apart to fix this screwup. And you have to remember to count how many rags you stuffed in there, because leaving one in there is also a major screwup. I managed to assemble the brake without mishap. Here you can see the spring, washer and nut threaded on

Image

The rags come put, and band clamp comes off. The wrench is used to tighten up the nut

Image

Image

The nut is tightened to adjust the brake band so it contacts the drum just before the pedal bottoms out. Then the oil screen and access plate go on

Image

Image

The foot throttle conversion goes on next

Image

Image

Finally the floorboards go in

Image

Tomorrow I will continue the brake installation by removing the stock brake drums from the rear wheels, and replacing them with the new brake discs.


Mon Apr 29, 2019 12:55 pm
Profile
Site Supporter
User avatar
Site Supporter

Location: Tacoma
Joined: Sat May 4, 2013
Posts: 3006
Tackled the rear wheels yesterday. Here is the left rear wheel straight off the truck, with the factory brake drum

Image

The bolts holding the drums on are peeled over, as is correct.

Image

Attacked them with an angle grinder to cut off the peened ends

Image

Image

I sprayed all the nuts with PB Blaster two days ago and let it soak in, as the nuts were pretty rusty. It seemed to work, as the nuts came off fairly easily.

Image

Drove out the old bolts with a punch

Image

Finally the drum came off with a little prying

Image

Cleaned up the hubs. They were covered in quite a bit of 93 year old dirt and grease. Those grooves in the hickory spokes are from the Rocky Mountain brake bands. This rubbing of the RM brake bands on the spokes is very common.

Image

After cleaning up the hubs, it was time to bolt on the new brake discs, using new hardware

Image

Image

Image

Image

Today I will tighten down these nuts and peen the ends over.

Image

Next up is reinstalling the emergency brakes and attaching the caliper brackets to the radius rod mounts


Thu May 02, 2019 8:10 am
Profile
Site Supporter
User avatar
Site Supporter

Location: Tacoma
Joined: Sat May 4, 2013
Posts: 3006
Took a few days off from wrenching to get some yard work done. Went back at it today. Started with reinstalling the emergency brake shoes

Image

Then the outer seal. Had to cut down the felt as it was too thick and caused interference between the wheel hub and the outer cup of the seal

Image

The outer cup was not a tight fit so I center punched dimples in it to snug it up

Image

Peened over the wheel hub bolts

Image

Ready now for the caliper bracket

Image

The old radius rod bolts come out, one way or another.

Image

Longer grade 8 bolts go in along with a spacer to properly position the caliper bracket

Image

Image

Then the caliper goes on. At first fit, the caliper wasn’t centered on the disc

Image

Found a grade 8 washer that was 0.75 inch thick, which was what I needed to move the bracket and caliper out the necessary amount. Had to open up the washer ID some, to get the bolt through

Image

Put it all back together and rechecked the caliper. It was centered now

Image

Torqued the caliper bracket mounting bolts down to the spec of 180 ft-lbs

Image

On goes the wheel, castle nut and hubcap. One side done

Image

Image

Other side next, followed by the master cylinder and brake lines


Sun May 05, 2019 4:58 pm
Profile
Online
Site Admin
User avatar
Site Admin

Location: Renton, WA
Joined: Sun Mar 13, 2011
Posts: 37790
Real Name: Steve
I've changed my mind about retiring in the future. Seems like too damn much work.

_________________
Steve

Benefactor Life Member, National Rifle Association
Life Member, Second Amendment Foundation
Life Member, Gun Owners of America
Life Member, Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms
Legal Action Supporter, Firearms Policy Coalition
Please support the organizations that support all of us.

Leave it cleaner than you found it.


Sun May 05, 2019 7:45 pm
Profile
Site Supporter
User avatar
Site Supporter

Location: Tacoma
Joined: Sat May 4, 2013
Posts: 3006
MadPick wrote:
I've changed my mind about retiring in the future. Seems like too damn much work.

Yeah, but the commute is good and my boss is cute.


Sun May 05, 2019 7:47 pm
Profile
Site Supporter
User avatar
Site Supporter

Location: Tacoma
Joined: Sat May 4, 2013
Posts: 3006
Started in on the right side brake caliper and immediately ran into a problem. The wheel hub fits to the axle with a taper fit. If either the hub or axle are worn, the wheel will slide too far down the axle taper and rub up against the outer axle seal. Even with the bare minimum of felt thickness. I had interference. In fact, with no felt at all the wheel hub still rubbed against the seal. Below are the seal, and the inside of the wheel hub

Image

Image

Image

The best fix for this is to replace the worn component. But new TT axles and hubs are nonexistent. And used ones are usually pretty badly worn. These trucks hauled heavy loads and were not treated gently. The other fix is to install an axle shim. These are available commercially for cars, but not for the trucks, which have a much larger axle. So I needed to make a shim. First step was to make a paper template. Took some notebook paper and wrapped it around the axle. It you squeeze it a bit you can impress marks on the paper that show you where to trim it

Image

Here is the trimmed template

Image

Then transfer it to shim stock.

Image

Wasn’t sure how thick a shim I needed, so I cut one from 0.005” and one from 0.008” stock.

Image

Then found a tapered punch to roll the shims around

Image

Image

Image

Did a test fit on the axle and the fit was good enough for Model T work!

Image

To check interference, I stuck some balls of clay on the outer seal cup and then mounted the wheel. Torqued down the axle nut to compress the clay balls. Pulled the wheel back off and found that the 0.005” shim gave me a clearance of 0.03” between the hub and the seal. Still pretty tight. Pulled the wheel off and swapped in the 0.008” shim. That was the ticket!

Now for the caliper bracket. Found that the caliper mounting bolts were too long, and hit the brake disc. Had to knock a quarter inch or so off each one. Most of you know this trick, but it’s a good idea to run a nut on before you cut the bolt. That way, when you take the nut off it chases the threads which makes it easier to start a nut on the shortened bolt. Dad taught me this many a moon ago. Well, probably 55 years ago to be more precise.

Image

Needed to add some washers here and there to center the caliper on the brake disc, but finally got it. Removed the caliper, so I could then remove the wheel (for the Umpteenth time), so I could then access the bracket mounting bolts and torque them down to 180 ft-lbs. Then the wheel and caliper go back on. And here it is

Image

Image

Master cylinder installation is next


Mon May 06, 2019 1:42 pm
Profile
User avatar

Location: Snohomish Co
Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2018
Posts: 122
I just had a thought, looking through you brake swap photos. How are your wheels? I've never driven wooden spoke, but i've head from old timers they can be a little uncomfortable at speed. Now i'm wondering what the stopping torque could do to them? Again, the only t's i've driven were steel wheels, and relatively slow.


Tue May 07, 2019 9:49 pm
Profile
Site Supporter
User avatar
Site Supporter

Location: Tacoma
Joined: Sat May 4, 2013
Posts: 3006
shaggy wrote:
I just had a thought, looking through you brake swap photos. How are your wheels? I've never driven wooden spoke, but i've head from old timers they can be a little uncomfortable at speed. Now i'm wondering what the stopping torque could do to them? Again, the only t's i've driven were steel wheels, and relatively slow.

The wheels are all sound, but there is no way to “true” them like with a metal spoked wheel. So they are not perfectly round. Which means that above 30 mph the ride gets rough. The upside is that my top speed is 30 mph, unless I’m going downhill in neutral, or off a cliff


Wed May 08, 2019 8:26 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 214 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 ... 15  Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: jukk0u and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum



Rent Me Pintos NRA SAF CCKRBA
Aldersons e-arms.com


Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Designed by ST Software for PTF.
[ Time : 0.878s | 15 Queries | GZIP : On ]